In the realm of electrical surge protection systems, the early versions of surge protectors (lightning arresters) required manual inspection on-site to assess their condition. This assessment was based on the discoloration of an indicator window on the surge protector itself, which signified its functionality.

However, considering a project might necessitate the installation of several hundred, or even thousands, of surge protectors, the task of individually checking each one on-site becomes an enormously labor-intensive endeavor.

To address this challenge and enhance the efficiency of inspections, a special device was added to these surge protectors: the “remote signaling contact point.”

So, how is the wiring connected for the remote signaling contact point of a surge protector?

ONCCY Electrical elucidates this topic from the following perspectives:

In the realm of electrical surge protection systems, the early versions of surge protectors (lightning arresters) required manual inspection on-site to assess their condition. This assessment was based on the discoloration of an indicator window on the surge protector itself, which signified its functionality.

However, considering a project might necessitate the installation of several hundred, or even thousands, of surge protectors, the task of individually checking each one on-site becomes an enormously labor-intensive endeavor.

To address this challenge and enhance the efficiency of inspections, a special device was added to these surge protectors: the “remote signaling contact point.”

So, how is the wiring connected for the remote signaling contact point of a surge protector?

Guangdong Zhongwei Intelligent Lightning Protection Technology Co., Ltd. elucidates this topic from the following perspectives:

  1. What is the remote signaling contact point of a surge protector?

The remote signaling contact point terminals of surge protectors (lightning arresters), also known as dry contacts, are primarily used for remote monitoring of the condition of the surge protectors. When a surge protector is damaged, it can output a discrete signal. If a customer wishes to remotely observe the degradation of the surge protector via a computer, this remote signaling terminal can be utilized for monitoring and integrated into their surveillance system.

As depicted below, the remote signaling contact point generally protrudes as a small green terminal on one side of the surge protector, making it easily noticeable.

The Remote Signaling Contact Point

  1. How to connect the wiring for the remote signaling contact point function of a surge protector

To understand how to connect the wiring for remote signaling, one must first recognize the labels on the remote signaling terminal: NO/NC/COM.

What do these three words signify?

COM represents the common terminal.

NC stands for Normally Closed contact. This means that when the surge protector is functioning normally, there is a closed (short-circuit) connection between NC and COM. If the surge protector fails, NC and COM will become an open circuit.

NO stands for Normally Open contact. This implies that when the surge protector is functioning normally, there is an open circuit between NO and COM. If the surge protector fails, NO and COM will become a closed (short-circuit) connection.

In the remote signaling contact point of the surge protector, the choice between normally open and normally closed depends on the type of signal the customer needs. Customers can choose the appropriate normally open or normally closed node for monitoring based on their own lightning protection monitoring system.

  1. As demonstrated in the wiring diagram below:Nc Com No

In conclusion, this is an overview of how to connect the wiring for the remote signaling contact point function of a surge protector, detailing various aspects of the remote signaling terminal. For any further clarifications, one can contact ONCCY Electrical Company for consultation.